Friday, April 14, 2017

Easter Holiday Pet Safety Tips!....


With Easter less than a week away families are already preparing for this festive holiday. While this is a fun time for families to come together and celebrate, Little Shelter would like to provide pet parents with some guidelines to make sure our furry family members remain safe throughout the celebration.
 
Plastic Grass - Easter baskets are generally filled with colorful plastic grass and while beautiful to look at, this is a potential danger to cats and dogs. This grass can become lodged in their throats or stuck in their intestines if chewed or accidentally swallowed. A safer alternative is to use colorful paper tissue.


Candy – Colorful candies like jelly beans and gummy bears are frequently given at Easter festivities. Many of these candies contain artificial sweeteners such as xylitol which is toxic to cats and dogs. Make sure these items are kept in covered containers or out of reach from pets.

Chocolate - From chocolate bunnies to Cadbury eggs, what would Easter be without these goodies? However chocolate is toxic to both cats and dogs so it should be stored where a snout can't sniff it out.

Raisins - Some parents like giving kids raisins as a healthier alternative to candy for Easter. Raisins are highly toxic for cats and dogs and should be kept out of reach.


***Symptoms of toxicity in pets: vomiting, diarrhea, seizures, abnormal heart rate, lethargy, excessive drinking – if your pet displays any of these symptoms call your vet immediately.***

Small Toys – Occasionally Easter baskets have small toys in them like Matchbox cars or fuzzy chicks. While these are fun for children, they present a potential choking hazard for our pets. Make sure these toys are not left around the house in places that cats and dogs might find them.

Candy Wrappers –  Make sure to clean up discarded candy wrappers and check around the house and yard for any that might have been left behind. Dogs and cats have a tendency to try and eat these since they smell like food.


Stuffed Toys – A more humane alternative than giving a live animal as an Easter gift is a stuffed bunny or duck. Stuffed animals for children can have plastic parts that could be chewed off and become lodged in a dog’s throat.


Easter Lilies - While beautiful for decorating a house, pet parents might want to seek out a safer alternative as these plants are toxic if ingested. A list of both toxic and non-toxic plants for dogs and cats can be seen by Clicking Here.

Easter Egg Hunts – Plastic eggs can pose a threat to dogs who may chew them and the treats kept inside them (commonly candy or coins) are not pet friendly. Some families hide dyed hard boiled eggs, but if forgotten these could make an animal sick if ingested after spoiling. Keep a list of every hidden egg and at the end of the hunt make sure that none have been forgotten.

Caffeine & Alcohol – From coffee & tea at the morning Easter egg hunt to alcoholic beverages at Easter supper, all these drinks contain chemicals that are not good for our pets. Make sure drinks are not left unattended and that any spills are quickly cleaned up.

Table Scraps – Many of our traditional favorites for Easter supper are not safe for our pets. They can contain spices, be high in fat and salt, or contain something toxic for our pets like garlic. Avoid giving table scraps to your pets and make sure food garbage is stored somewhere they can’t get to it.


A Quiet Place - With all the commotion of the festivities going on throughout the day it is not uncommon for our dogs and cats to become stressed due to over stimulation. Make sure they have a quiet place to retreat if they need a break. If you have an energetic dog, it's advisable to take them for a long walk before company arrives to help tire them out. If your dog is a beggar for food, try giving them a light meal before food is put out.


Little Shelter hopes you and your family have a happy and safe Easter!
 

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